Silent Night – Christmas Day 1914

Venue: James Stephens Army Barracks
Date: Sat 15th & Sun 16th Dec
Time: 4pm & 6pm
Price: Adult €10.00 / Children U16 €5.00 (Proceeds are going to The Good Shepherd Centre)

A collaboration with James Stephens Army Barracks, all proceeds are going to The Good Shepherd Centre for homeless men in Kilkenny.

This wonderful experience begins with a tour of the James Stephens Army Barracks, starting at the Museum which has an important role in Kilkenny’s heritage.

The tour will end with ‘Silent Night – Christmas Day 1914’ – A commemoration of the truce during the First World War when soldiers from both sides met peacefully to share a precious pause in the carnage and a fleeting moment of brotherhood.

This special event welcomes visitors via the side entrance to the museum with a line of wooden soldiers standing to attention as a fun addition to the overall decoration.

1st Stop
The Museum – where stories of events of Christmas past will be told (15 mins)

2nd Stop
Detention Barracks – visitors enter a courtyard that will be decorated with reindeer lights, head into the detention centre where the naughty elf is locked up. The history of the detention cells will be recounted. (10 mins)

3rd Stop
The Cobbled Courtyard – here the visitors will get to meet ‘Santa paws’ Fionn the Army Irish Wolfhound mascot (10mins).

4th Stop
The Officer’s Mess – where visitors will be treated to a hot drink and refreshments (20 mins)

If tickets are sold out you can still support The Good Shepherd Centre by purchasing special Christmas cards or a 2019 calendar featuring Fionn (Irish Wolfhound and mascot for the 3rd Infantry Battalion) with proceeds going to The Good Shepherd Centre and Teac Tom. Fionn calendar (€10) and Fionn Christmas cards are available directly from the James Stephens Army Barracks, Ballybought Street, Co. Kilkenny, tel: 056 772 1174.

Funded by Creative Ireland under the Kilkenny Culture and Creativity Strategy 2018-2022, in partnership with Kilkenny County Council. Placing creativity at the centre of public policy